Peter Strickland . digital artist

Conceptual design example - Sliding car doors
visualisation

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Front and rear sliding doors

visualisation

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Hinges and rails

visualisation

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Construction

The trouble with car doors

Cars seem to get a little wider every year, parking spaces haven't changed for decades. Hinged doors have to swing wide to open, so they hit the car next to you. So you twist, slide your foot in, bend your standing leg, try to sit down, now try to get your trailing leg in.

A sliding door would be easier, but those rails down to outside don't look good. Then there's all the furniture in the way, sill, pillar, that bit of the roof designed to catch unwary heads.

A better door

Well a sliding door will open in a tight space, but the rails could do with running along the inside. A powered slider and anti-collision sensors would make life easier. The front door can slide forwards and the back door backwards, that way they don't project beyond the front and back of the car.

The door frame

Build the cars structure into the door and you don't need all that funiture around the doorway, no sill, no pillar, a cut away roof that leaves room for your head.

The car still needs all that structure, so build it into the door. The door then bolts securely to the car when closed, so it strengthens the body. Do it right and you can make the car structurally stronger and a little lighter too.

Putting it all together

My illustration shows how it can be done: sliding doors with structural frames, with bolts to secure them.

All images copyright Peter Strickland © 2003 - 2014